Haapsalu, Estonia: beach resort of Imperial Russia

View from the Pavilion on the Promenade in Haapsalu

Despite the unseasonably cold spring, I really wanted to see the seaside resort town of Haapsalu while we were in the area, en route from Tallinn to Parnu. Renowned for centuries for curative mud and a popular spa resort with the Romanov family, Haapsalu is actively seeking to reassert itself as an international resort destination. [We were in Haapsalu May 2017. I’ve been enjoying a low-key summer and have been slow about finalizing my last two Estonia posts–this and one more on Parnu. We were supposed to be in Miami and Havana this coming week, but those plans are canceled due to Hurricane Irma, so I’m taking the opportunity to catch up blogging our Baltics travels before we head back to Belgium in October.]

We turned out to be the only guests at Lahe Guesthouse, the bed and breakfast I’d chosen for our stay. Our hostess was waiting for us when we arrived, showed us the rooms available, then left us on our own in her big, beautiful guest house with a key and the run of the place. It was fun!

Lahe Guesthouse. The two windows on the second floor, left, were our bedroom and offered views of the bay and marshes.
Dining area of Lahe Guesthouse with no one else around on our off-season stay. (Our hostess did return to fix breakfast in the morning.)
One side of our spacious guest room
Marshes and bay behind Lahe Guesthouse

After settling in, we walked away from the marshes and into town.

We saw few people on our way into Haapsalu town

Haapsalu is small, so in a few short blocks, we arrived at the remains of the 13th century Haapsalu Episcopal Castle, the former residence of the Bishops of Saare-Lääne. The semi-restored castle grounds and walls are open to the public without charge. We had fun just strolling and people-watching. Perched atop a portion of the wall, we laughed at the antics of a little boy zooming endlessly around the inner grounds on his foot-powered “motorcycle” while an older sibling ran after. There’s also a museum, encompassing the castle’s cathedral, that we did not visit, but it’s closed now until 2019 for renovations.

Entrance to Haapsalu Castle
Entering Haapsalu Castle
Haapsalu Castle ruins
Haapsalu Episcopal Castle cathedral

Leaving of the castle, we walked through the old town towards the waterfront Promenade.

Old Haapsalu

The pretty Russian Orthodox Church of Mary-Magdalene sits between old town and the Promenade, overlooking the water.

Russian Orthodox Church of Mary-Magdalene

The Promenade is the pride of Haapsalu. Lovingly decorated by Estonian Roman Haavamägi in the 1920’s, Haapsalu suffered during WWII and many of Haavamägi’s wooden sculptures that decorated the seafront Promenade were burnt. Recent restoration was completed and the Promenade reopened in 2010.

Haapsalu Sundial on the Promenade
Haapsalu Promenade with the Assembly Hall and iconic wooden polar bear statue (a replica) in the water

We enjoyed walking the Promenade, but it is definitely a sleepy place in the non-summer months. After dinner downtown followed by a shot of the local, vodka-like birch water alcohol, we called it a night. The next day, we strolled the paved walkways through the wild marshland behind our guest house before setting out again to explore the back roads of Estonia. Haapsalu made for a fun short visit and I’m glad we went, but there’s not much to keep a visitor there for long off-season.

Looking back towards the neighborhood of Lahe Guesthouse from the marsh paths

Comments and questions are welcome!