The Jane: a world-class dining experience in Antwerp, Belgium

 

Friends from the U.S. coming to visit us in Antwerp finally motivated us to try The Jane, one of Antwerp’s two 2-Michelin starred restaurants and Diner’s Club pick for one of the top 50 restaurants in the world. Occupying the converted chapel of a former military hospital, The Jane is a mere 10-minute walk from our Antwerp home-away-from-home. We’d walked by many times, even eyed their menu online, but the astronomical price and difficulty in getting reservations dissuaded us on previous stays. We had a 4-day window when our friends would be here and, sure enough, there were no reservations available at The Jane during this period. We put our name on the dinner wait list and were able to get a reservation after about 2 weeks. 8pm was the only dining time available, a little late for us given the length of the expected meal and our friends’ early departure the next day, but we jumped on the opportunity nevertheless.

We were greeted warmly at the hostess desk which faces the front door backed by a wall that closes off the main dining room from view. This provides diners with a theatrical first glimpse of the vaulted dining room dominated by a massive modern “chandelier,” a many branched glass-and-steel structure that spans most of the large space. Opposite the entrance, a wall of glass frames the bustling kitchen high above which a whimsical neon sign reads “CAN I STAY A LITTLE LONGER, I’M SO HAPPY HERE.”

The massive light fixture and avant garde decor really work with the backdrop of peeling, unpainted ceiling of the old church and quirky stained glass windows. [See lead photo above.] In keeping with The Jane’s reverential attitude towards fine cuisine, the kitchen occupies the former altar space.

A printed copy of the 14-course menu was on the table when we sat. Our first waiter arrived to ask for our aperitif choices, giving us 4 options (champagne and 3 signature cocktails), to go with the first amuse bouche courses.  (We lost count of how many people waited on us over the course of the meal; I think it was a cast of 8 to 10 people.)

There was no printed description or price list for the drinks. Our preference for wine (a 2010 San Leonardo from Italy; cabernet sauvignon, carmenere, merlot; 95 points on Robert Parker) over aperitifs slowed things down a little, but the first 4 amuse bouches arrived relatively promptly.

COURSE #1. Amuse bouche: Jane-grown tomato with watermelon and burrata
COURSE #2. Amuse bouche: Eggplant in miso draped in French Noir de Bigorre ham served on a warm stone with a side beverage of 6 apple juices and sake.
COURSE #3. Amuse bouche: Ceviche with small white radishes, a dollop of avocado, savory leaves in a citrus-y marinade.

Oddly, it was not until after a few of the amuse bouche courses that we were handed a menu with prices and options for the 13-course menu and wine pairings. This left us feeling a little off-balance and unsure of what to expect throughout the first portion of the meal, but was not a huge issue. We opted for the full 14 courses since choosing the 13-course menu (€20 cheaper) would have deprived us of the langoustine and cep course which really was a highlight. Good choice on our part. We declined the wine pairing options and one of our friends chose several bottles of wine.

The menu gives only a bare description of what to expect. There were many more ingredients and even extra little plates and bowls (and one drink) that appeared with each course. Each course was a treat for the eyes as well as the palate with a mind- and palate-boggling array of little flourishes and dollops and leaves and flowers and frozen pellets and gilded bits. Flavors were generally exquisite with my only quibble being that several were a touch too salty for me, which is unusual since I like salty foods. All in all, it was fun to explore our way through each dish although I readily admit to being unable to identify some of the tastes and ingredients on display. I’m not a professional food critic, so you get what you get with this post.

COURSE #4. Amuse bouche: Glazed local eel from the Schelde River Bai hao Yin Zhen dashi topped with crispy kale, in broth

The prix fixe menus are in effect for 11 weeks with minor changes due to availability of ingredients. (The current menu only recently went into effect.) After an 11-week run, the staff takes a 2-week break and returns to a new seasonal menu that is in place for the next 11 weeks.

COURSE #5. 1st main course: Mackerel with Jane-grown beet and black garlic. Also beet-infused tapioca, 4 tasty dollops of uncertain but delicious origin, foams, vinaigrette and a delicate crisp.
COURSE #6. 2nd main course: Scallop, cucumber & seaweed with freeze-dried citrus balls (giving off a light “fog”) with tasty “leathers” and a dollop or more tasty, but unidentifiable ingredients
COURSE #7. 3rd main course: Langoustine, ceps and zuchini garnished with nasturtium. Absolutely spectacular!

The current menu is very heavily weighted toward seafood proteins, which we loved, but which might be to everyone’s taste: ceviche, eel, mackerel, scallops, langoustine, shrimp, John Dory.

COURSE #8. 4th main course: Grey North Sea shrimp, potato & beurre noisette. For those unfamiliar, the shrimp are small–like bay shrimp, but very tasty.
COURSE #9. 5th main course: John Dory with artichoke hearts and a side bowl of shellfish (mussels) and a tiny bit of pasta

Only the poulet de Bresse (chicken) course, served with sweetbreads and a liver spread on chicken skin crisps, bucked this trend. Items are chef’s choice, although there are options offered to allow for allergies and dietary restrictions.

COURSE #10. 6th main course: Poulet de Bresse, vol-au-vent, carrot with sides of sweetbreads and chicken liver paté on a chicken skin crisp
COURSE #11. “Semi-dessert”: BBQ apple with a mezcalnegroni ice cream and cinnamon

The only flaws: While service started out well and was always friendly and not at all stuffy, something went off-track later in the meal and we started experiencing long waits between courses. A couple of times, wine glasses were left empty for stretches as well. By 11pm, 3 hours into our meal, we still had many courses to go. We were in no hurry and fully expected and looked forward to an extended dining experience, but the lapses became too much. Eventually, we asked a waiter if we could get our three dessert courses at once since our friends had an early train to Amsterdam to catch a plane the next morning.

COURSE #12. Dessert: A chocolate/mocha creation with Tanariva milk chocolate, nocciola (hazelnut) & espresso. This one was so complicated (and delicous!), including a small mousse, ice cream, crisps of varying types, dabs and dollops and gold. I loved it!

To The Jane staff’s credit, they did speed things up after we asked, even bringing the chocolate course ahead of the last dessert. The chocolate was a house-made La Esmeralda 74% dark chocolate bar with dried fruit and salt that came on a marble block with a special weighted tool for breaking the bar, tongs and a bag for taking home any extra pieces.

COURSE #13. House-made La Esmeralda 74% dark chocolate bar with bullseye wrapper to help diners strike the right blow with the special weighted tool provided. Also, tongs and a bag for a take-home treat.
Unbroken La Esmeralda chocolate bar from The Jane at home

We finished dinner sometime after midnight and got the check around 12:30am. The slowed service at the end of the meal wasn’t enough to ruin our meal, but it was a surprising lapse in service by a restaurant of this caliber. It was a particular disappointment since, prior to things going awry, one of our foodie friends had just pronounced every course to that point flawless and the meal as one of the top ten of his life.

COURSE #14. Final dessert: “Kaiserschmarrn”, described as made with “shredded pancakes,” it was like a fluffy bread pudding dotted with raisins and served with a side of rum ice cream. Excellent!

Another minor point: After 4+ hours of dining, the repetitive beat of the looping low-key techno-pop music starts to grate.

Practical info: Our total bill for four persons was €904: €600 for four 14-course fixed price menus, €34 for still and sparkling water throughout the meal, and €270 for 3 bottles of wine. Not something we’d do on a regular basis, but a night at The Jane is an experience as much as a meal.

Dress was smart casual with women wearing pants, skirts or dresses and men in slacks and sports coats, with or without ties, occasionally minus a jacket.

Find more info and book reservations or join wait lists on The Jane’s website. The Jane books full far in advance, but an initial back-up wait list lunch reservation came through for us in a matter of days (via an email which requires you to accept or deny a firm reservation). We waited about two weeks for to get a dinner reservation off the wait list. In that case, David called to see where we were on the list and was told they’d just had a cancellation and we were in for the 8pm time slot. (All that was available.) NOTE: The Jane requires a credit card to hold a reservation and there is a €50 per person charge for cancellations within 48 hours.

Allergies or diet restrictions can be accommodated, but there is a €15 charge if no advance notice is given.

There is a cheaper Upper Room Bar at The Jane where a maximum of four persons can make reservations for drinks, etc. two weeks in advance. Again, find more info on that on The Jane’s website. (Click the top center graphic to get the drop down menu.)

Comments and questions are welcome!