Quick tip: How to keep Google from going local when you travel

When your computer finds itself in a new country, Google will “helpfully” switch to the local version. Even when you type in “google.com,” Google will automatically switch to “google.xx” (e.g., in Belgium, it’s “google.be”). This can be really annoying when you don’t speak the local language and downright mystifying when the page is in an indecipherable alphabet. Often, you’ll see a link option for English or can click through to the U.S. “Google.com” at the bottom of the search page, but I’ve found those options are not always available (or findable). To solve the problem, just type in “google.com/ncr”. This will get you back to good ole google.com. If, like me, you’ve got your browser set to automatically open Google when you open a new tab, just make that default page “google.com/ncr” and you’ll automatically get the standard Google no matter where you are. read more

Using Google Maps and Google Translate to navigate Japanese transit systems (and other useful things)

Our first full day truly off the boat with luggage in tow, we made our first travel error by hopping on a train going in the wrong direction. So much for my travel wiles! It’s not something I do often, but I’ve definitely done it before. Usually, I catch it sooner, though: It took me 30 minutes before I noticed we were getting more rural instead of the expected Tokyo skyline. A personal “best.” Aaargh. Oh well, easy enough to get on a train going the other direction; just an annoying waste of time and some extra schlepping of luggage. But, this was when I discovered a really great trick for navigating Tokyo trains, metro and bus: Google Maps combined with Google Translate. [Both require Internet connection (although there’s an offline option for Google Translate where you download a specific language; see below), so get a SIM card if you can. See my earlier post about NTT Docomo card. It’s been great for us.] read more