The start of a one-month cruise from Singapore to Italy

The 8 “Sweet Sixteen” port-side cabins on Celebrity Millennium class ships are just above the “S” through the blue space after the “N” in “CONSTELLATION” the photo above.

As part of our 3-month around-the-world journey, we spent one month on the Celebrity ship Constellation. This was actually two 2-week, back-to-back (“B2B”) cruises. The first two weeks were more a traditional cruise with many stops: Phuket, Thailand; Colombo, Sri Lanka; Cochin, Goa and Mubai, India; Muscat, Oman; Dubai and Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. The second two weeks were more along the lines of a repositioning cruise, i.e., fewer stops and a bargain price as the ship moved from one region to another for a season. This cruise took us from Abu Dhabi back to Muscat, Oman, through the Suez Canal, to Piraeus (Athens) and Katakolon (ancient Olympia), Greece, and dropped us off at Civitavecchia, Italy (the port nearest Rome, although we did not go back to Rome on this trip, but rather picked up a rent car to spend a couple weeks in Umbria and Tuscany before flying from Florence to Belgium).

Upcoming posts covering the cruise period will have more information on ports, directed to cruisers, in addition to regular travelogues. [I’m not that into cruise ship activities and such, but tend to view ships as moving hotels and chose cruises based on itinerary, i.e., ports-of-call and transportation from one point to another. Click here for an earlier post on my philosophy on cruising as well as tips for finding the best deals.] I had some misgivings that a month might be too long on a ship, but we had an amazing time and my only regret is that I can’t do it all for the first time again!

With regards to Constellation, one of Celebrity’s Millennium class ships: I once again booked one of the “Sweet Sixteen” cabins about which I blogged when we sailed trans-Pacific on Constellation‘s sister ship Millennium. [Click here for that post.] These cabins offer a suite-type, double-sized balcony for the price of a regular balcony cabin. For some reason, the extra-large balconies do not appear on the ships’ diagrams and the cabins are categorized as regular balcony staterooms. I prefer the rear-most of these cabins because they offer extra privacy from the cabin just sternward and a more open view. (Both times I booked one of these staterooms, the booking agent had no idea that these cabins existed.)

Celebrity Millennium-class “Sweet 16” cabins: double the balcony at no extra charge

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Celebrity Millennium “Sweet 16” balcony, cabin 6030. The balcony of our neighbor to the right ended at the midpoint rib in the privacy wall.

The “Sweet Sixteen” cabins on Celebrity’s Millennium-class ships are a little-known anomaly: 8 cabins on each side of Deck 6 offer double-deep balconies for the same price as their otherwise-identical neighbors. For some reason, the Sweet Sixteen don’t appear on the deck plans (which depict the cabins as having shallow balconies just like the others on that deck). In researching our trans-Pacific cruise, I came across mention of these cabins and, since we booked very early, I found that nearly all of them were still available. (My booking agent had never heard of these cabins, but secured my preferred cabin.)

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Close up of Deck 6 plan showing no difference in balcony size between the Sweet 16 and their neighbors

I deliberately chose the aft-most cabin on the starboard side, 6030, as I was curious about the view toward the stern and liked the idea that one of our neighboring balconies would be set back from our own. I liked my choice and we did have an extra element of privacy and a more open view sternward.

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View toward the stern from balcony of 6030
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Sweet 16 cabin 6030 is just above the “C” in “Celebrity” with the other Sweet 16’s on starboard going to the right until just over the “E” in “Millennium”

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While these cabins don’t come with lounge chairs, there is plenty of room for them and I did read of one cruiser who was able to have two delivered after tipping his steward. The primary negative of these balconies is that the people above you can look down on the front half of your balcony. I knew this going in, and it didn’t bother me at all, but it might be a consideration for some.

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Looking up and toward the bow from the balcony of 6030. Shows “gap” in deck over the balconies above

All of the Sweet Sixteen balconies are not identical. The first 3 have thick support columns that run from 3 levels above to the front of their balconies and a full roof at that level above them. (The smaller balconies above these Sweet Sixteen are in a recessed, cave-like setting that wouldn’t be at all to my liking.) The lowest numbered of the Sweet Sixteen on the starboard side (6016) has a solid wall on the left as you look off the balcony, rather than the usual opaque privacy walls. The front half of our balcony and those of most of the remaining 6 cabins on each side are shaded by a deck overhang 4 stories above. (The back half of each balcony is shaded by the 3 levels of balconies immediately above.) However, cabin 6026 on starboard and cabin 6031 on the port side fall within a gap in the above deck and might get more sun (and less protection from rain).

Celebrity has four Millennium-class ships: Summit, Constellation, Infinity and Millennium.